OOParts – Curiosities That Can’t Be Ignored?

My writing, especially in paranormal and alternate history, takes me to some very interesting places. Lately, I’ve been spending a good amount of time studying up on OOParts (Out Of Place Artifacts), which is a term applied to prehistoric objects found throughout the world that defy their level of technology, and are at odds with their age based on physical, geological, or chemical evidence.

“They are often frustrating to conventional scientists and a delight to adventurous investigators and individuals interested in alternative scientific theories.”

There are many within scientific mainstream who dismiss OOParts in general, claiming their history can be explained, their creation is not out of place to the historical period in which they’re aligned, and that the people who built or constructed them were entirely capable of doing so. In short, it’s Occam’s Razor at work: the simplest answer or explanation is often the correct one.

And yet there are others who challenge these explanations, claiming there is more to Earth and our history than we want to admit. Because, according to them, to admit the truth means we have to admit that we are wrong in some of our historical interpretations and that there is, or was, something else at work as humans progressed into the advanced civilization we know today.

In other words, how could ancient man, with simple tools and a supposedly less-educated mind, create or build some of the amazing artifacts and historical sites we’ve discovered? Whatever your thoughts on the matter, I’m intrigued by all possibilities and that’s what prompts me to write the paranormal, alternate history fiction I have a passion for.

Here are some OOParts that might make you go hmm:

copyright: Wikipedia

copyright: Wikipedia

Acámbaro Figures. In 1944, a guy named Waldemar Julsrud found a clay figure near the banks of Cerro del Toro in Acámbaro, Guanjato, Mexico. When he started discovering more of them, he hired a team who went on to uncover 32,000 figurines depicting dinosaurs, unknown animals, an extinct species of rhinoceros, a horse that hasn’t been around since the Ice Age, and other unidentified species no one has seen before. Others show human figures hunting. Carbon dating placed the artifacts at 5,000 years old, that are similar to stones found in Peru. Some argue that some pieces are incomplete and that they haven’t been able to replicate carbon-dating results. But if they are a fraud, why carve 32,000 pieces? That’s a heck of a lot of work for the hype.

copyright: Wikipedia

copyright: Wikipedia

Göbekli Tepe. This is an archaeological site in Turkey that dates to the 10th millennium BCE, which clocks in at 14,000-15,000 years ago when hunter-gatherers roamed the land. The area is made up of ring-shaped pits and monoliths that stand at 16 feet tall, and was most likely a temple. But here’s the thing: each of the pillars weighs from seven to ten tons each, and those hunter-gatherers hadn’t figured out how to make pottery or tools made of metal yet. So how did they get them into place, and so perfectly?

The Goddard Coin. A Norse coin found in a Native American Settlement, stamped between 1065 and 1080 during the reign of King Olaf III. How did an ancient Norse artifact end up on Native American soil during that time period? And why was it the only one? Did the Vikings really travel further south than we believed they did? And, if so, why is it the only Norse artifact found there? Was it planted? Or is there another story at work we don’t know about, and maybe never will?

copyright UNESCO

copyright UNESCO

Nazca Lines. A series of ancient geoglyphs in the Nazca Desert, Peru. Created between 500BC and 500AD, they depict figures of monkeys, fish, birds, spiders, trees, flowers, and many other shapes. The largest measures in at 660 feet. At first, it was believed these Lines could only be seen from flying overhead, but others claim that they can be viewed from adjacent hills. And even if that’s the case, why were they designed in the first place?

There is no arguing that there are anomalies or mysteries at work here, much as there are in interpreting how the Ancient Egyptians built the pyramids with such mathematical or astronomical precision, or how Stonehenge was constructed, along with so many other artifacts and sites that intrigue the imagination. But if there’s one lesson I’ve learned in my continuing research, it’s that man wasn’t as uneducated as we sometimes like to think they were. I truly believe they had skills and smarts we still are only learning about. But unless someone can go back in time, or someone can come forward in time, we’ll never have all the answers.

Until then, I’ll continue to create my own theories and explanations in my own stories. 🙂

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About terriponce

I write about twists, turns, past lives and suspense.
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18 Responses to OOParts – Curiosities That Can’t Be Ignored?

  1. Reblogged this on Musings on Life & Experience and commented:
    Interesting information indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. davidprosser says:

    The period known as the Dark Ages after the Romans left Britain were thought to be a time of uneducated savages roaming a land isolated from the world with no culture. Over the last 50 years or so excavations at Tintagel in Cornwall and Cadbury in Somerset have shown the remains of huge fortifications which show Kings or maybe just warlords existed who traded with other countries since wine and oil jars have been found. It shows that our history tends to be based on what some experts tell us and that may change as more artefacts are uncovered bringing a different tale. How lucky for those from the future that we keep good records these days of what we do.
    xxx Huge Hugs xxx

    Like

    • terriponce says:

      It is a good thing that we are able to unearth, literally, more of the truth. It may lead to more questions, but I believe it is good to question authority and “conventional wisdom”. Just because someone says something is so doesn’t mean it’s right. Between all of us, we should be able to find the definitive truth.

      Like

  3. I love this stuff! Ancient aliens and all! Thanks for a great write-up! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Reblogged this on Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog and commented:
    I think OOParts (Out Of Place Artifacts) are fascinating, thought provoking and hint of a history we have yet to understand 😃

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sacha Black says:

    Very interesting. Doing a lot of research and reading on this myself and just started a series called weekly wonders which deals with mysteries just like this. You ever heard of the ancient astronaut theory? It attempts to give an explanation to a lot of this….. Still blows my mind, but the deeper I dig the more answers and questions I seem to find… Welcome to the truth…. 😊😊 great to connect

    Liked by 1 person

    • terriponce says:

      Most definitely heard of the ancient astronaut theory. Also a fan of the show Ancient Aliens. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sacha Black says:

        LOVE that show. We are clearly going to get on! Have followed u and will do so with interest.

        I am a huge fan of the theory. Have u heard of the publishing company Bear & co?? A lot of the books covering this genre are heavy going – zitchen for a start is super hard going for me. But the Bear and Co books are easier to read more user friendly – currently reading aliens in ancient Egypt – a fascinating read. Would recommend it. I have a post going live tomorrow about Giants and the annunaki and nephilim. And did one on sound propulsion and coral castle last week.

        Will you write about this kind of stuff more often or was it a one off?

        Like

      • terriponce says:

        Would love to write more about this stuff. And will look into those books. Thanks for alerting me!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sacha Black says:

        No probs. look forward to seeing more of this.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Ali Isaac says:

    I hate that ancient man is dismissed as primitive. I also hate that anything unexplained has to be the work of ‘aliens’. Why is it so impossible for us to believe that there were ancient civilisations around who knew far more than we do now? I’m with you on that one.

    And I’ve flown over the Nazca lines in a tiny rickety 2 seater plane with holes you could fit your fist through, but when I saw the lines I forgot everything else… and fortunately lived to tell the tale lol!

    Enjoyed your post immensely!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Jack Eason says:

    Reblogged this on Have We Had Help? and commented:
    This kind of thing absolutely fascinates me. Thanks to Nicholas Rossis for forwarding the link. 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Another great post 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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